Posts

Get Out of Your Bubble

Can you imagine what it would be like to live in a sterile environment without physical human contact? No doubt you’ve heard the phrase, “living in a bubble,” or something similar. It was coined a few decades ago, based on the movie of a boy with an underdeveloped immune system who had to live in a bubble-like environment.

This made-for-TV movie came out in 1976 (The Boy in the Plastic Bubble), combining the life stories of two boys with rare diseases. Of course, the movie dramatized the story (added some fiction) and a romantic theme far from reality. But the concept of living in a bubble, like an incubator, caught hold in a cultural expression.

In real life, these boys were unable to venture out of their bubble-like environments without fatal consequences. And yet, their great desire was to live outside the bubble.

Living in a bubble

It wasn’t long before people applied the phrase living in a bubble to other situations and people. For example, the office of the U.S. presidency is bubble-like, with the 24/7 Secret Service guard, and screening of people whom the president will come in contact.

Today it could apply to people focused on their cell phones, gaming, and social media in a virtual bubble. The phrase came to describe anyone isolated from the world around them.

Sadly, this describes many Christian believers. Many Christians live in an insulated Christian world surrounded by other Christians, and locked into Christian-oriented media and music. And, many Christians like it this way and don’t want to leave this protective bubble—their faith bubble.

Even more sadly, the world around them is untouched by their Christian beliefs and values. Why? Intentionally or not, we’ve constructed an ivory tower of faith.

Not as Jesus intended

This is not what Jesus had in mind when He spoke of the Kingdom of God on earth. Not at all. This bubble-like isolation isn’t reflected in Jesus’ teaching about the kingdom.

This bubble-like isolation isn’t reflected in Jesus’ teaching about the kingdom.

Jesus had an entirely different way of life intended for His followers, which is seen in several parables and other teachings.

In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus sent out twelve disciples to “preach the kingdom and to heal the sick” (Luke 9:1-6). Later, in the last year of the Lord’s ministry on earth, Jesus sent out seventy others in the same way (Luke 10:1-12).

His final instructions to those who would lead the church after His departure extended this same message—But the Holy Spirit will come on you and give you power. You will be my witnesses. You will tell people everywhere about me—in Jerusalem, in the rest of Judea, in Samaria, and in every part of the world. (Acts 1:8 ERV)

This is also echoed in all four of the gospels and termed the Great Commission (see What Do You Not Understand About “Go”?). It is clear, Jesus intended for His followers to be empowered to go out with His message to the world around them.

Getting out of the Christian bubble

For the “Boy in the Bubble,” leaving the bubble put him at risk for his life. But it’s different for us followers of Christ. Our spiritual life is at risk if we don’t get outside the bubble.

Our spiritual life is at risk if we don’t get outside the bubble.

We need to engage people who have different values and beliefs than our own. Here’s a blog post by Pastor Cary Nieuwhof that addresses this— The Evangelism Conversation No One Is Having.

Over the past several weeks, I’ve posted articles related to this week’s topic—sharing our faith without being aggressive or overbearing. But, we have to be willing to get out of the Christian bubble to engage people who don’t share our faith.

Here are the links to those articles—

How to Be an Evangelist—Without Really Trying
What’s Your Story Morning Glory?
Getting Personal
Ready to Engage

One simple question— Are you willing to get out of your own faith-bubble to engage people about faith?

Trip Kimball planted a Calvary Chapel in 1978 and in 1990 took them to the Philippines as missionaries. There in Asia he was used by God to not only establish Rainbow Village for abandoned babies, but serve in equipping hundreds of national pastors and church planters. Currently Trip serves from his Florida home as a mentor with CCPN, as an integral part of Poimen Ministries and continues to equip leaders in the States as well as in missionary settings.

Resources to Grow in Preaching

Preaching gives the most ear hours than any other form of communication in the church. By that I mean for all the discipleship, classes, counseling and casual conversations a pastor has through the week; more people are listening for longer periods to his prepared sermons than anything else. This is why I propose it is imperative for church planters to continue to learn and grow in presenting God’s word even after the formal training has ended and the work has begun.

…it is imperative for church planters to continue to learn and grow in presenting God’s word even after the formal training has ended and the work has begun.

While listening to good preaching is a great tool, I also strongly suggest continuing to purposely learn about preaching. Below is a far from exhaustive list of resources that I have found helpful in continuing to learn and grow as a preacher. My hope is to fill the comment section with resources you have found helpful to continuing learning and growing in preaching after initial training. Post your thoughts and resources there.

Three Podcasts

  1. Sermon Smith, John Chandler interviews pastors concerning sermon prep.
  2. On Preaching, H.B.Charles Jr. offers valuable insights.
  3. The Sermonators, Evangelist Scott Smith and Pastor Joel Sutherland have great love for preaching and preachers. 

Three Blogs, and an addition

  1. Walk in the Word with James McDonald.
  2. Biblical Preaching, Pondering preaching that shares God’s heart.
  3. The Short Preacher, Taylor Sandlin (Don’t miss the quotes on preaching).
  4. Special addition: it will be profitable to read Pastor David Guzik’s four part series titled Critical Elements of Biblical Preaching posted on the CalvaryChapel.com website.

Four Books

  1. Calvary Church Planting Manual, has an excellent and concise section on expository teacher training.
  2. Art and Craft of Biblical Preaching: A Comprehensive Resource for Today’s Communicators by Haddon Robinson and Craig Larson is a modern classic.
  3. Christ-Centered Preaching: Redeeming the Expository Sermon, by Bryan Chappell is possibly the most comprehensive modern book on expository preaching.
  4. Preaching and Preachers by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones an all time classic in which the Dr. reminds us, “The most urgent need in the Christian Church today is true preaching.”

Four Hard to Categorize Honorable Mentions

  1. The Exchange, is Ed Stetzer’s podcast that can keep busy church planters updated with issues affecting ministry.
  2. Rainer on Leadership, is a blog and podcast by head of LifeWay Thom S. Rainer. Recent topics include, Why Preaching is Scary, and 10 Things You Shouldn’t Say to a Pastor Right After the Sermon.
  3. Calvarychapel.com is effectively the clearinghouse for our tribe and a great source of encouragement, enlightenment and edification.
  4. The Productive Pastor, is a podcast from Pastor Chad Brooks offering insight into time management and productivity for the modern pastor in the modern tech oriented world.

Ed Compean is a missionary church planting coach based in Nairobi with his wife Kelli, but they are preparing to move back to the States later this year. You can read their blog or follow him on Twitter @Ed_Compean.

Orality

My university had a Gutenberg Bible. I remember standing over its glass case and feeling deep emotion as I considered how God used people like John Wycliffe, John Hus and others to bring the written word of God to common people. With no disrespect to the memories of those that gave so much so we can read God’s written revelation to us, as people involved with planting churches we must wrestle with the fact that there are approximately 3-billion adults that are primarily oral learners and will never open their Bible. It is important to us to consider methods of bringing the revelation of God to people that can not appreciate that Bible I stood over.

As people involved with planting churches we must wrestle with the fact that there are approximately 3-billion adults that are primarily oral learners and will never open their Bible.

I’ll presume the majority of readership of the Calvary Church Planting Network blog are either North American, or otherwise strongly connected to North America where the majority of people are literate. It is reasonable in those settings to expect the majority of people present to understand when the pastor, or small group leader says, “Please open with me to the Gospel of John, chapter 3.” While it may not seem like a major concern for those planting in the North America, I would like to propose two reasons why oral strategies for bringing God’s revelation should be considered along with our Movement’s rich heritage of systematically expositing the Bible.

The Next Generation of Churches

Recently I heard there are 1,600 current Calvary Chapels. Of course the greatest concentration is in the United States, with Mexico coming in second. While I pray every Calvary remains honest and true to what makes us distinct, and what I believe is a strategic role in the greater Kingdom, I also suspect the next 1,600 Calvary Chapel churches will operate vastly different than the first. Among those differences will likely be more churches planted among those that learn orally and not from a Bible in their lap. This means not changing the gospel message itself, but adapting the Biblical preaching, Biblical teaching and Biblical methods of discipleship to orality methods. This will be important as Calvary Chapel missionaries continue to open foreign fields, but also among America and Mexico’s immigrant populations (as God is faithful to bring the nations).

People not in Church Now

The United States Census Bureau reports almost 20-percent of the population has at least one disability. In the majority world those numbers are likely larger, especially if we include gender inequality and lack of education issues that hinder ability. Joni Eareckson Tada summed it up by saying,  “Only five to ten percent of the world’s disabled are effectively reached with the gospel, making the disability community one of the largest unreached (some say under-reached) or hidden people groups in the world.” While the disabled may not be able to carry a Bible, hold a Bible, sit with their Bible or follow a traditional church service, they are still image bearers of God and worthy of being reached out to in creative ways that allows them to become disciples that make disciples.

“Only five to ten percent of the world’s disabled are effectively reached with the gospel, making the disability community one of the largest unreached (some say under-reached) or hidden people groups in the world.” – Joni Eareckson Tada

What Can Church Planters Do?

First: consider creative ways to bring the revelation of God to oral learners. In Schools of Ministry and other settings, consider adding oral techniques of discipleship such as Chronological Bible Storying along with the traditional Inductive Bible Study training. Consider starting small groups based around audio scriptures, like Talking Bibles, in the mother tongue of immigrants in your community. Both these and other oral techniques are effective for oral learners and the disabled in all settings.
Second: consider purposely reaching out to the disabled by bringing them to church gatherings, but also possibly by going to them. For a church plant on a budget, small group studies, prayer meetings, or even mid-week services in a local convalescent homes can be very attractive to the existing church, but also to those that otherwise would not come to where Jesus is (Mark 2:3). The disabled may not be able to fill a pew, give much, or serve in traditional ways, but they are completely able to be the church and be ministered to by church planters.

The disabled may not be able to fill a pew, give much, or serve in traditional ways, but they are completely able to be the church and be ministered to by church planters.

Ed Compean is a church planting missionary and coach based in Nairobi. You can follow his Twitter feed @Ed_Compean, or check out the Uttermost Blog.

Use the image below to share this blog on social media:

orality - IG

ReEngage Conference Video Content

The video content from our recent ReEngage Church Planting Conference in Costa Mesa is now available! We’ll be releasing a few videos each day until they’re all available.

As you’ll see, the videos contain powerful and informative information for pastor, church planters, mentors, and so much more. We would encourage you to take some time to watch the videos as they become available, and make sure to pass them on to people in your social circles.

The video content can be accessed at reengage.ccpnetwork.org.

We hope you’re blessed by these videos and that you launch out in faith to what God is calling you to!

Overcoming the Default Setting

Pastor Bill Walden pastors Cornerstone Ministries of Napa Valley. You can find out more info about him on his blog at pastorbillwalden.com, and about his church at cmmv.org.

Everyone has a default setting.  The default setting is what we like the most; it’s what we do naturally, and what we are inclined to repeat regularly.  A person’s default setting could consist of good or bad personality traits.  Our default setting might be useful or useless.  Regardless of what behaviors or thoughts our default setting consists of, it is what we do naturally and almost without thinking. It is you on automatic pilot.

Church planters have a default setting. For some, it might be towards evangelism. For others, it might be towards intense sermon prep and good expositional teaching.  In pastoral ministry and in church planting, we have things that we naturally gravitate to, and that are useful to the kingdom of God. That’s a good thing, to a point.

If a church planter stays busy following his natural inclination, there is a good chance that he is inadvertently missing a few things that will affect his church down the road.  He may be using the gifts that God has given him, but if he only works within his default setting, he will have an unbalanced church.

If a church planter stays busy following his natural inclination, there is a good chance that he is inadvertently missing a few things that will affect his church down the road.

I am not suggesting that the church planter try to be and do everything.  I am also not suggesting that he try to operate outside of his gifts, or to be someone or something that God did not create him to be.

What I am suggesting is this:  First, the church planter will do well to make a list of what he feels a healthy church looks like.  If God blesses his efforts, what will that church look like in five or ten years?  Make that “dream list”.  A snapshot into the future of what you believe a Biblical church ought to look like.

Second, do some self-examination, and be mindful of what your default setting is.  What do you do naturally?  What do you do first?  What is easy for you to do?

Then make another list.  What do you not do naturally?  What do you procrastinate on?  What do you tend to not get done?  What things on that “dream list” are not getting done?  What are the things that you do last, if at all?  If you continue ministering only directed by your default setting, what kind of church might you have in ten years?

I understand the challenges of church planting.  I have personally planted two churches.  The second church I planted was while I was pastoring the first church I planted.  I pastored two churches for about two years. I eventually handed that second church off, and continue to pastor my original church. I understand not having enough time, enough people, enough resources, etc.

What I am suggesting is that the church planter be mindful of his own inclinations to do certain things, and to overlook other things.  If we have an idea of what a healthy church should look like, then we need to try, as time allows, to pay attention or be mindful of all those aspects of a healthy church.

Let me conclude by making some practical applications.

  1. Understand your own default setting.
  2. Try to be mindful to do, or to delegate to others, those things that you are not gifted at, or not inclined to do.  You can’t do everything, but be mindful that they need to be done, or attempted.
  3. There are probably things that are not part of your default setting, but that you can and should do.  Keep reminding and forcing yourself to get some of those things done.  Don’t procrastinate on them, and do only what comes naturally to you. Perhaps do the “unnatural” thing first.
  4. You may feel inadequate about doing some things that on not part of your default setting.  Try to do them anyway.  You can grow in areas that you are not particularly gifted at.  Some aspects of ministry may never be your strong points, but try to give those aspects of church life some attention.
  5. Finally, for me, I have to regularly force myself to operate outside of my default setting.  The church needs me to be as multi-dimensional as possible.  I can’t be Superman, nor shine in areas where I am not gifted, but if I am mindful of my default setting, I can purpose to think outside that setting, and give attention to all the needs of the church. I can grow in areas where I am not particularly gifted.

 

Church Growth Rules We Broke

“How to grow your church” is a huge topic these days, especially over the last decade with the increasing popularity and glamorization of church planting. There are entire volumes and series of books and magazines dedicated to the topic, citing the top “church growth experts,” current trends and popular speakers. There are lots of rules and tips about things you should do and things you shouldn’t do, many of which are great and very helpful.

However, as a church planter in the South, I’ve found that some of the church growth tips, tricks, and trends aren’t necessarily true. Although we’ve learned from plenty of mistakes along the way, we’ve seen God use many of the rules that we’ve broken…

1. “Don’t teach on Revelation.”

Whoops. I didn’t know about this rule till after I had already broken it. Revelation is too controversial, too violent, and far too judgmental and close-minded. The moment you open that book, your church will start shrinking…or so some people seem to think.

We spent 37 weeks in the book of Revelation. Awaken continued to grow and people continually got saved (almost every week). Just ask the 88 people who made decisions for Christ if it was fruitful or not!

2. “Don’t talk about hell.”

I get it. Hell is hot and forever. It makes people uncomfortable. But Jesus talked all about it, and I’m pretty sure one of His primary goals was church planting (“I will build my Church…”). If it’s a real place, why would we not warn people about it?

One thing we say often at Awaken is, “If it’s in the Bible, we’re going to talk about it.” Hell is definitely in the Bible.

3. “Don’t preach longer than 20 minutes.”

I was once told that adult brains “are programmed to sitcom-length intervals. They can’t handle much longer than 22 minutes.” How are college students sitting through 60-minute lectures on economics then? The Bible contains all we need “for life and godliness!”

I’ll admit that I’ve been to some churches that I couldn’t imagine listening to the pastor for more than 15 minutes, but that’s not the Bible’s fault! Pastors: PLEASE don’t bore people with the Word of God! It’s alive and active, preach it as such!

As one pastor put it, “Sermonettes make Christianettes.” Going deep requires some time – from the pastor and from the church.

4. “People just want to be encouraged.”

What we’ve found over the years is that people aren’t looking for 15-minute sermonettes peppered with spiritual hugs and high fives. They want meat. They want honesty. They want truth – even if it hurts. After a sermon I preached recently someone told me, “What I love about this church is that you have the guts to say it how it is and people keep coming back!”

At the end of my life and ministry, I don’t want to be guilty of editing out the things I thought were “too harsh” or “not encouraging enough.” I just want to be faithful in handling the Word of God. God wrote it and did not leave me with editing rights.

Where Do I Start? (CCBC Class Pt. 3)

Each Monday, we go back to school at Calvary Chapel Bible College as I take you through my church planting class. So far in this series, we’ve covered What Church Planting Is and Is Not, as well as The Calling and Equipping.

————————–

Where do I start? That was the main question we answered today during Day 3 of Church Planting Class. We began with the unglamorous and often unmentioned side of Church Planting – the business side.

Some authors have paralleled Jesus to a CEO and try to pull business principles from His ministry. Although He was the greatest leader the world has ever known and we have endless things to learn from Him, I don’t like viewing Him as a CEO and I definitely don’t think His Church should be viewed as a start-up business. We’re His bride, not His project.

However, for any church to have longevity, there are certain legal and structural guidelines that must be followed. Everything from the incorporation process (including bylaws and a board of directors) to 501(c)(3) applications and payroll. Jesus said to “render to Caesar what is Caesar’s” and like it or not, “Caesar” may be more involved than many people realize!

Jesus said to “render to Caesar what is Caesar’s” and like it or not, “Caesar” may be more involved than many people realize!

Like anything though, there must be a balance. If you overlook the business side of the church, it won’t last. But if you run the church entirely as a business, it will prevent you from taking steps of faith. After all, there have been quite a few times in just my 3 years of planting Awaken that I’ve undertaken a project or outreach that didn’t exactly measure up on paper (The Uprising)!

If you overlook the business side of the church, it won’t last. But if you run the church entirely as a business, it will prevent you from taking steps of faith.

In addition to the un-glamorous business side of the church, we also talked about the practical side of how to figure out where to go, and some things to keep in mind when you first get to your city.

We watched a quick video from a friend of mine, Chuck Musselwhite, a Calvary Pastor in California. I also passed on some helpful links:

CCPN: http://calvarychurchplanting.org

Here you can get resources to either be mentored as a church planter or mentor other church planters. You can also listen to and watch sessions from their ReEngage Conference that they had last year. You can hear great, practical stuff from Brian Broderson, David Guzik, Ed Stetzer, and more! (I hear the blog is great, too!)

Calvary’s main website: http://calvarychapel.com

On Calvary’s main site, you can check out the church locator to get an idea of an area of the US or the world where they could benefit from a Calvary. You can search within a 1,000-mile radius by zip code, state, or city!

Calvary Chapel Association: http://calvarychapelassociation.com

Once you have a place in mind and/or you’ve already moved there or begun the process, you can go to the CCA site to begin the affiliation process. By selecting the region of the US or world that you’re in, you can find out which pastor(s) to contact to get the ball rolling on affiliation with Calvary Chapel.

We also covered some practical things to think about before and during the launch of the church. We discussed the importance of a vision statement that’s concise and catchy, that communicates why your church exists. We talked about the pros and cons of different types of church planting timelines: denominational, interest meetings, preview services, and the route I took, “Hit the ground running!”

One of the most practical parts of the day was a 15-minute personal project where each person scoured the Bible for practical examples of people who used what was in their hands to benefit others and glorify God. There were tons of great examples which led to great discussion: things like David’s slingshot and harp-playing skills, Esther’s position as queen, Tabitha’s clothes-making skills, the boy who gave Jesus his lunch, Moses’ staff, Paul’s prison sentence, and so much more. Some of the examples seemed positive, others seemed negative, but the point was simple: God uses ordinary things for extraordinary purposes.

The goal of the exercise was to help us all understand that we are probably much more equipped then we realize. We refuse to allow a perceived need to prevent us from preaching the Gospel. We’ll embrace our limitations, get creative, and use what’s in our hands to benefit others and glorify God.

We refuse to allow a perceived need to prevent us from preaching the Gospel. We’ll embrace our limitations, get creative, and use what’s in our hands to benefit others and glorify God.

20130227_pt2b

What Church Planting Is and Is Not (CCBC class Pt 1)

Early in 2013, I had the privilege of teaching a 10-day block class about church planting at the Calvary Chapel Bible College in Murrieta, CA. I basically, ate, drank, and slept church planting for 8 days as I prepared and taught. It was exhausting, but I learned a lot…and so did my class. Over the next couple months, each Monday, I’ll give you a chance to come to class with me as I sum up what I taught each day. Enjoy, and make sure to pass this on to someone who can use it!

You can read the original post on my blog here.

———————————

Here’s a quick recap of what we covered on Day 1…

Day 1 was an intro to myself and the story of Awaken Church. It’s always fun to relive the story and recount God’s faithfulness, confirmation, and provision even in the years leading up to the launch. It’s easy to get so caught up in the action that I temporarily lose sight of all that God has done to get us to this point.

After sharing pictures and stories from the first couple years of Awaken, I began by dashing their hopes and dreams of what church planting is really like. We discussed what church planting is not and what church planting is.

Church Planting is NOT…

COOL. Unfortunately, church planting has become “trendy” lately. It’s what a lot of young guys are doing and have done, and some have unfortunately fallen into the trap of stepping into something that seemed “cool” without counting the cost.

FUN. If you think church planting will be a fun way to get some neat experiences, you’re wrong. It’s a fierce battle that will tear your family to shreds if you’re not prepared. You will have fun planting a church if it’s what God has called you to do. But even that will only come after lots of hard work and dedication.

ABOUT YOU. Whether it’s planting a church or just ministry in general, some people step into ministry to prove something to others or to themselves. We addressed the tendency and dangers of using ministry to compete against others or boost your ego.

A HOBBY. If you’re just looking for something to pass some time, fly a kite, read a book, or plant a garden, but please don’t plant a church. The stakes are too high. Souls are at stake and the reputation of Jesus and His Church are on the line!

Church Planting IS…

HARD. It’s hard mentally, physically, and spiritually. It’s hard on you, your team, your family, and your marriage. But generally speaking, nothing that’s easy to do is worth giving your life for!

EFFECTIVE. Planting a church is one of the most effective ways to preach the Gospel and reach a city. God uses it in HUGE ways in those who are leading and those who get involved.

REWARDING. There’s a big difference between “fun” and “rewarding.” “Fun” can be as simple as throwing something off a balcony and watching it explode when it hits the ground. “Rewarding” implies investment and perseverance. As you pour your life into the church, there will be exciting temporal milestones, but there are also eternal rewards that are accruing (1 Corinthians 15:58, Hebrews 6:10)!

A BOOST TO YOUR PRAYER LIFE. I thought I had a decent handle on praying…until I planted a church. I learned more about the power of prayer through the avenue of church planting than through any other event in my life. Simple reliance on the Lord through prayer is huge.

20130225_1_whatwhy_group1c

God’s Word Speaks

Pastor Terry McNabb of Calvary Chapel Portland shares about the importance of relying on the power of Scripture to speak to people’s lives. Wise words after over 20 years of ministry!

———————————

When preparing sermons I am constantly faced with addressing deep personal issues in people’s lives. How can I help people out of life-long destructive habits that they are sometimes comfortable with or completely unaware of? It’s so easy to become impatient and irritated with people instead of reminding them of the love and grace of God. In fact, preaching today has degraded into speaking of a God of love that doesn’t ask us to change from our sin. God loves us as we are. Over twenty years of ministry I have seen over and over again how God’s word does the job of speaking right to people’s hearts in a gracious way. It just happened as I taught Jonah 4 of how Jonah became angry with God and wanted to die. Quite an overreaction! This is a common issue. People are bitter about something that has happened in their lives and it must be God’s fault. When I might have become too pointed and critical about a problem of bitterness toward God, the Scriptures spoke right to the heart. As I told the story of Jonah’s anger because God was merciful to the Ninevites, people could see how foolish Jonah was. His anger didn’t make sense. He was in God’s will and had a successful ministry so why was he angry? The lessons were clear…

1) Jonah’s part was just to deliver the message not to write it. 

2) God wasn’t asking Jonah for his opinion on the outcome of his ministry. God wanted to be merciful to Nineveh.

3) Unhappiness doesn’t mean we are out of God’s will. Jonah was in God’s will, he just didn’t like what God was doing.

4) God was patient with Jonah even in his anger and God is patient with us.

As I told the story, people could see how foolish Jonah was. They could see themselves in Jonah and how easy it is to become caught in bitterness even when God is working in our lives.

Seeing the deep needs of people is a great responsibility. In sermon preparation God’s Word will do the work for us. We could never speak right to the heart as God can. Our tone is often lacking grace or our words so general that it isn’t helpful. If we are just teaching the Word then people aren’t offended at us. They can see the lesson in the Word of God and realize they must deal with what God has shown them.

In sermon preparation God’s Word will do the work for us. We could never speak right to the heart as God can.

 2 Tim 3:16-17 – All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work.